Latitude 53 presents Visualeyez 2017, the seventeenth edition of Canada's annual festival of performance art, from September 26–October 1, exploring the theme of awkwardness

Day 6 Afternoon GROUP WORK – performance in real time by Pam Patterson

Posted by Irene Loughlin on September 20th, 2014

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(l to r): Soufia Bensaid, Pam Patterson, Angela Skaley  Photo: Irene Loughlin

Well, as we speak I’m both in and blogging about Pam Patterson’s performance work which includes the artists from the festival:  Nayeon Yang, Gavin Krastin, Soufia Bensaid, and as well as some visiting artists/participants: Ester Scott MacKay, Beau Coleman and Angela Skaley.

At first I felt kind of sad that I wasn’t performing with them although I am kind of performing with them (I’m sitting at the table typing this, but they’ve all left me about 10 minutes ago for the video area of the room) but it all seems good right now.  I took a photo of them throwing a stack of images that represented themselves in the centre of the table. That was the beginning of the performance.  (inserted 6 am Day 7)

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Performance by Pam Patterson   Photo: Irene Loughlin

I’m struck by how the performance is somewhat slowly paced but I’m having a hard time keeping up.  The viewers are sitting against the wall on benches, at the north wall of the gallery.  I wonder why they don’t come over here.

Now the artists are taking from a huge pile of bricks, and they are stacking the bricks by each artist’s pre-stationed, open umbrella.  Audio has started of rain and there’s old film footage of a man running by a brick wall.  Beau, Gavin and Ester cast shadows of various lengths into the video projection.  Some of the stacked bricks are also shadowed in the projection.  They’ve picked up their umbrellas and are now walking around the space.  Another brick in the wall by Pink Floyd is playing and each of them have a different action with the brick.  Nayeon seems to be scrubbing the floor with her brick.  Beau is rubbing two bricks together.  Pam is slowly lifting a brick to the ceiling then down to the ground.  I haven’t caught the rest (although they all had their individual actions) because now they have started throwing the bricks.

hey teacher leave them kids alone

Perhaps a reoccuring theme as earlier this morning we spoke of research-based practice.  But I still have to organize the notes from this morning, so today’s posts are not created in a linear fashion.  I hope you don’t mind.

Well, this turns out to be quite a clever piece.  Nayeon is dragging her umbrella full of bricks.  Several of the umbrellas have been deconstructed into their basic form.

Well I wish I had time to post the photos right now but I don’t I’ll do it later.  It does seem like general chaos now.  Should Pam really be holding Gavin up to the ceiling?  I don’t think that’s so good for her body.  Oh now Beau is helping her.  They are doing it!  He’s hanging the umbrellas off the grid, which is pretty high up since Latitude has high ceilings.

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(l to r: Beau Coleman, Nayeon Yang, Gavin Krastin, Pam Patterson, Angela Skaley) Photo: Irene Loughlin

There’s various aesthetic arrangements of bricks on the floor. Check out this one. That’s Ester’s.

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Arrangement of bricks by Ester Scott MacKay, work by Pam Patterson  Photo: Irene Loughlin

There seems to be a lull where not much is going on. That’s great maybe I can post a photo.  Oh wait, Gavin is throwing a brick into the corner.  Now Beau is going to. Soufia just jumped for an umbrella.  This seems to be the destruction phase of the performance.

Oh they are all sitting down now. Thats my cue.  I’m supposed to turn the light off or something. I think I’ll make them wait.  They all construct a personal symbol as they stand behind their chairs (generally with their hands), something that represents them but I can’t catch it.  now they sat down and are ripping up their paper. gavin just threw some afrgAT ME. its interfering with my typingg. damn itsannoying.  noow i can’t ssew the screen.  see the screen.  i should take a picture. oh well.  seems like the piece is over i think perhaps?

yes seems like it is.  the end.

 

 

 

Day 5 Entrances and Exits

Posted by Irene Loughlin on September 20th, 2014

Entrances and exits were the topic of conversation this morning as we gathered around the table. We were happy to have Edmonton artist Beau Coleman with us today.

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(l to r) Beau Coleman and Pam Patterson  Photo: Irene Loughlin

We all know the drill when it comes to entrances and exits on a theatrical stage.  An actor or dancer emerges from stage left or stage right, usually from behind some heavy black velvet curtains, and disappears into the wings similarly upon exiting.   Somehow performance art is different.  Entrances and exits often embody an ambiguity for the viewer.  ‘Is it over?’ is a question that generally hangs over the uncertain endings of a performance art work.  Perhaps someone takes the plunge and claps, and are followed hesitantly by other viewers. The clapping increases in volume when we realize that its all ok, that no one is reappearing in the space.  Its assumed that the person that claps first is most likely “in the know”, (otherwise, why would they take the risk?) and has some secret knowledge of the ending of the work. Its safe to follow along.  Perhaps they are a friend of the performer?

Although there’s often uncertainty on the part of the viewer,  Soufia contributed that coming into a space as a performer brings with it a definite consciousness and intentionality.  Pam questioned the expectations of a beginning and an end in performance, citing the concept of the suspension or arrest as an important aspect of movement in dance.  Todd talked about the permeable borders of the audience and Gavin and Pam talked about locating the beginning of the performance in a conceptual rather than a physical moment. Such conceptual beginnings might be found in an evocative thought or object, a discussion with the Festival Director (sometimes years in advance), or in the first meetings with collaborators.

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Soufia Bensaid, Nightwalk  Photo: Irene Loughlin

Endings were also located in the recollections of the viewers such as the stories they told of the performance sometimes years after the fact, when memory could not be counted on for complete accuracy.  The ephemera of the piece (such as the postcards in Nayeon’s work) might also be places where endings are found.   Soufia spoke of the profound after effect of the performance on the body, which is in fact, unspeakable in terms of psychic transformations.  Endings might also be found in the impact and markings of physical injuries that could have occurred during the performance. Beau mentioned that the performance takes on a kind of sculptural form in reflection, to think on a piece necessarily transforms the performance into an art object.  I asked Nayeon why she did not look for an exit at the end of her performance in public space as there were many opportunities to duck behind a food truck for example.  She explained that by not exiting the performance becomes more about the viewer, their need to discuss the work or not, and that not exiting diffuses the separation between life and art.

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Pam Patterson on Practice-Based Research, University of Alberta Photo: Irene Loughlin

In the afternoon, we went to a lecture by Pam Patterson in Natalie Loveless’ class at the University of Alberta where Pam presented on practice-based research in performance.  I’m stil somewhat confused by the concept of practice-based research, although we kicked this idea around at the University of Toronto (particularly with artist Yam Lau)  during my graduate studies.  I’m proposing we talk more about this idea Day 6 in our morning sessions.

Cindy Baker

Lipstick and Bullets by Cindy Baker at The Feminist Exhibition Space at the University of Alberta Photo: Irene Loughlin

Luckily, we also ran into Cindy Baker in the parking lot of U of A.  You can currently see her exhibition Lipsticks and Bullets, at the Feminist Exhibition Space at the University of Alberta (until Dec 23rd).  I waited for her artist talk in the sunshine, experiencing the sublime on campus while the fall leaves rained down on me. Cindy’s artist talk and the exhibition covered many fascinating observations on the subject of lipstick and bullets.  Did you know that ammunition factories during the war became lipstick production factories after the war, where bullet encasings were transformed into the casings for lipstick through just a slight alteration?  You can also see a cast of Cindy’s clitoris displayed with the other lipsticks, as a response to a discussion on always defaulting to Freudian interpretations of the phallic when contemplating objects such as lipstick casings.  Which, when you think about it, the Freudian association doesn’t really make sense. Great woman, great exhibition.

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Gavin Krastin, assisted by Karen Gill   Photo: Irene Loughlin

In the evening Gavin presented the second instalment of his performance. Although I had previously seen this work, it was as hypnotic as the first viewing.  Later, Soufia Bensaid took a group on a silent night walk in the area.  I followed for a while but due to an old knee injury I left the group somewhat early as I’d been standing most of the day.  I missed the finale of the walk where Adam apparently sang beautifully to the traffic. I’ll try to upload that audio with Soufia today.  Day 5 was a thought-provoking day, and I’m looking forward to unpacking the ideas put forward in Day 5 at breakfast this morning, which is Day 6. Unfortunately, its our last day! Well, at least we will always have the Visualeyez Gala, scheduled for later tonight!

 

 

Welcome to Visualeyez!

Posted by Irene Loughlin on September 16th, 2014

I arrived in Edmonton last night, armed with iPad, laptop and phone, happy to be the Visualeyez blogger and eager to begin documenting the cultural life of the city.  Here is my first victim.

common edmonton hare

the common Edmonton hare

If you find a solitary baby hare in Edmonton, do not pick it up.  If you do, you are a KIDNAPPER. (more…)